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June, 2013:

luacs

Year 5 has been really cool with a teacher i have never been with befor and doing diffrent tests

Emily

hi everyone i cant wait to go to blackpool and Lyme park with St. Christophers primary school can anyone tell me if your going on the PEPSI MAX can two people sit next to me so i squeeze them so tight if i am tall enough 🙂 bye emily

HI ITS emily hope you are all okay can you please improve this sentence!

 

the tiger roared loudly.

I maths

I like maths because you get to do go things you get to do pestigs and bar charts and you get to do graphs and you can make shapes out of clixiy. nathan

year 5 is my class

Hello I am Aciea, the things I have been enjoying in year 5 is doing work with my teacher miss Cavanagh,

playing rounders outside, meeting people that weren’t at my class in year 3/4 and lots more.

I love my new class because the builders made it other then the old art room.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Punch And Judy By Jasiah

Punch and Judy is a traditional, popular puppet show featuring Mr.Punch and his wife, Judy. The performance consists of a sequence of short scenes, each depicting an interaction between two characters, most typically the violent Punch and one other character. It is often associated with traditional English seaside culture.

The show is performed by a single puppeteer inside the booth, known since Victorian times as a “Professor” or “Punchman,” and assisted sometimes by a “Bottler”, who corrals the audience outside the booth, introduces the performance and collects the money (“the bottle”). The Bottler might also play accompanying music or sound effects on a drum or guitar and engage in back chat with the puppets, sometimes repeating the same or the copied lines that may have been difficult for the audience to understand. In Victorian times the drum and pan pipes were the instruments of choice. Today, the audience is also encouraged to participate, calling out to the characters on the stage to warn them of danger, or clue them into what is going on behind their backs. Also nowadays most Professors work solo since the need for a bottler became less important when busking with the show gave way to paid engagements at private parties or public events.

The characters in a Punch and Judy show are not fixed as in a Shakespeare play, for instance. They are similar to the cast of a soap opera or a folk tale like Robin Hood. While the principal characters must appear, the lesser characters are included at the discretion of the performer. New characters may be added as the tradition evolves, and older characters dropped.

Along with Punch and Judy, the cast of characters usually includes their baby, a hungry crocodile, a clown, an officious policeman, and a prop string of sausages.[1] The devil and the generic hangman Jack Ketch may still make their appearances but, if so, Punch will always get the better of them. The cast of a typical Punch and Judy show today will include:

  • Mr. Punch

  • Judy
  • The Baby
  • The Constable
  • Joey the Clown
  • The Crocodile
  • The Skeleton
  • The Doctor

Characters once regular but now occasional include:

  • Toby the Dog
  • Hector the Horse
  • Pretty Polly
  • The Hangman (a.k.a. Jack Ketch)
  • The Devil
  • The Beadle
  • Mr. Scaramouche

Characters only seen in a historical re-enactment performance include:

  • The Servant (or “The Minstrel”)
  • The Blind Man

Other characters included Boxers, Chinese Plate Spinners, topical figures, a trick puppet with an extending neck (the “Courtier”) and a monkey. A live Dog Toby which sat on the playboard and performed ‘with’ the puppets was once a regular featured novelty routine.

Dr Barnardo By Jasiah

Thomas John Barnardo (4 July 1845 – 19 September 1905) was a philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children, born in Dublin. From the foundation of the first Barnardos home in 1870 to the date of Barnardo’s death, nearly 100,000 children had been rescued, trained and given a better life.

Barnardo was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1845. He was the fourth of five children of John Michaelis Barnardo, a furrier, and his second wife, Abigail,an Englishwoman and member of the Plymouth Brethren. In the early 1840s, John emigrated from Hamburg to Dublin, where he established a business; he married twice and fathered seventeen children. The Barnardo origins are uncertain; the family “traced its origin to Venice, followed by conversion to the Lutheran Church in the sixteenth century,” but others have claimed German Jewish roots for them.

With the intention of qualifying for medical missionary work in China, Barnardo studied medicine at the London Hospital, and later at Paris and Edinburgh, where he became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. However, he never earned a doctorate, and in later life he was prosecuted for falsely claiming he was a doctor.